From the Editor:
The October 2015 issue of The American Legion Magazine for a strong America featured an amazing article about Noah Galloway. Galloway, a Legion member of The American Legion Post 911 in Birmingham, Alabama, overcame severe war injuries and depression to re-embrace fitness, dance with the stars and inspire America.

On the night of December 19, 2005, Galloway told his commanding officer that he would drive the lead truck in the Triangle of Death. That led to an explosion that took his left arm and left leg and landed him in a depressive state. The following is quoted from the magazine article written by Henry Howard: 

Wearing his night-vision goggles, Galloway did not see the tripwire strewn across the road as the three-truck convoy headed out to pick up other platoon members. The blast flipped his armored Humvee into a ditch. "I never saw it" recalls Galloway. "Lt Eidson said that before it went off, he saw a bush that was out of place for a second, then boom! It went off. It hit my door and threw my 9,000 pound Humvee flying through the air and landing in a canal adjacent to the road. The water was up to my chest. I had a huge hole in my jaw. They thought I was already dead."

The amazing thing is that Galloway shielded Eidson and gunner, Ryan Davis, who each suffered minor injuries. Eidson surveyed the scene, saw that Galloway was still breathing, and scrambled back up the 15-foot slippery slope to the road for help. The accompanying Humvees had sped past the kill zone following protocol to leave the scene after an IED explosion. "They blew through the smoke and didn't see the truck and assumed that we did the same and hauled butt," Eidson remembers. "They didn't know we were stuck down in the canal, so I got out and didn't see anybody."

After checking on Galloway again and getting Davis out, Eidson returned to the lonely road. His commander denied a request for a rescue convoy. Their only hope was for the other two Humvees to return. "Essentially we were just kind of just waiting for the moment for somebody to open fire since an ambush is usually associated with those types of explosions, but it didn't happen," Eidson says. "Honestly, I prayed. I prayed that God would send somebody to come and help us. I don't believe it was a coincidence, but after I said that prayer those guys came back in the trucks and were able to get us out."

We could go on with the rest of this story, but you'll have to read the article yourself. If you are an American Legion member, then you already have the magazine in your home. If not, go to www.legion.org and request a copy of the October 2015 issue of The American Legion Magazine. The bottom line is that Galloway miraculously survived, managed to get through all the problems associated with losing parts of his body, and went on to inspire America. If you saw him on the TV show, "Dancing With The Stars," then you know him. He went on to win the hearts of America, courageously dancing with his partner with one missing leg and one missing arm.

A very big "thank you" goes to every veteran who ever sacrificed something to help guarantee our freedom. There's never enough that can be said to express the gratitude for such a heroic act. Best wishes to you always from a fellow veteran who cares!
Thank you!
Bob Naffier
-SPECIAL STORY-